As a restorational method for recovering temazcalli red-medicine for Split Feather –Xicana girls women and mothers working to restore traditional Indigenous birth and mothering practices and in response to my own loss of Eldership as an Indigenous woman and mother, I created a year long performance ceremony titled “The Earth is my Elder, An Indiginist Methodology for Re-indigenizing Women, Mothers and other Lost Relatives.” In this ceremony, I lay on the earth in a relational restoration of land based epistemology. This performance also includes a series of residencies, The Indígena Project, of reindigenizing girls women and mothers who have lost connection with their ancestral people, land, language and culture. These residencies in which I am included as a facilitator-participant collaborator, each culminate in a public trauma-driven performance protest in which we ceremonially offer an earth based ritual of maternal restoration.  ~ Krista

Our Dream

Somewhere down my mother-line, the women relatives sang as their sister, daughter, niece, and granddaughter drank down wináwizi čík’ala, wild licorice root, and hummed the baby down.

Instead, I was the lone buffalo, moaning in the grass–grass covered in my blood and my water. I think even my blood wanted to know–where did the women go?

All I knew, and know, is that this way, is NOT our way. And like the buffalo, who are being returned to their homelands by the ones who hear the call to remember their allegiance to protect and preserve, I too am being called to return birth and motherhood to their homelands.

When and if my daughter chooses to birth, she will NOT be alone in the grass, bleeding. She will not raise her children in isolation. She will not doubt her wisdom to the point of collapse.

I will sing to her the sweet gutturals of our mother tongue, and wipe her brow with cloth washed on the rocks of the river.

~ Rebecca Lee, Indígena Project resident-participant-collaborator

Founder, Facilitators & Collaborators

KRISTA ARIAS
KRISTA ARIASfounder facilitator participant collaborator
REBECCA LEE
REBECCA LEEparticipant collaborator
CASANDRA JIMENEZ
CASANDRA JIMENEZparticipant collaborator
FELIX KALYPSO
FELIX KALYPSOparticipant collaborator

Also Cecilia Flor, Carlie Dominguez, Xilomen Rios and Kathryn Ely (photos and bios coming soon)

My favorite part about inviting the audience to participate was that they started storytelling & knowledge sharing about stitching techniques. This is it. This is where we come from. THIS is how community is created and knowledge is shared.

Cassandra

It all began with the question: Is it possible to use the limited fragments available from Elders along with listening to body and earth relationally within diasporic community of Indigenous women, to remember, recover and restore what has been lost?

Krista